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Seasonal Fruit & Vegetables

Enjoy the autumn harvest with a healthy helping of home-grown vegetables

Warners Budgens Taste Club
Kale

Kale

This is cabbage’s hardier, more robust ancestor and is full of tough-acting nutrients to match. It enjoys cold, harsh climates, so not surprisingly, most of our kale is home-grown. It does the same job as cabbage – great in stir fries, soups or stews, but a great trick to encourage the children to eat it is to make kale chips – just mix with sesame oil and soya sauce, then spread onto a baking tray and bake until crisp. A bit like a British version of Japanese seaweed!

Try this: maximise on kale’s nutritional value by making a raw salad. Roughly chop the leaves and wash well. Turn into a bowl with a teaspoon of salt, lemon juice and honey. Leave to soak up the juices then drain. Add grated ginger, a sprinkling of toasted sesame seeds and a glug of olive oil and serve.

Mushrooms

Mushrooms

Fabulous wild fungi are at their peak in autumn although you can buy cultivated mushrooms all year round. Mushrooms vary greatly in flavour and appearance – lovely nutty chestnut mushrooms are perfectly suited for garlicky mushrooms on toast while little button mushrooms are ideal additions to a boeuf bourguignon. Big, juicy, Portobello mushrooms are crying out to be stuffed with herbs and butter, while delicate oyster mushrooms enjoy nothing more than a quick fry off in an oriental stir fry.

Try this: choose flavoursome chestnut mushrooms for your next risotto – the more intense flavour really makes a difference to the final dish.

Squash

Squash

While squashes do come in all shapes and sizes, the one you most commonly come across in the UK is the butternut. And it’s a real winner – soft, buttery flesh that absorbs a range of flavours, a beautiful orange glow that looks appealing when mashed or puréed, plus it’s a decent size which means it can be easily stuffed with rice and sultanas to make a satisfying meal. Other squashes include spaghetti squash, another brightly coloured variant whose flesh turns into spaghetti-like strings when cooked.

Try this: Take a look at Chef’s Table for the Broadway Hotel’s mushroom and squash tart recipe

Parsnip

Parsnip

This earthy root vegetables is just coming into season, though many claim that the best parsnips are those picked after the first frost as the cold causes the plant to convert its starch into sugar. However, cooking parsnip, whether that’s tossing them with a little honey or maple syrup and roasting them, or even boiling them and puréeing into a soup, creates enough sweetness for most palates. They have much the same use as potatoes but with a higher nutritional value – try making parsnip rosties, using parsnip mash on pies or making parsnip chips for the children.

Try this: make a warming tray of maple-roasted parsnips by peeling and halving the parsnips lengthways. Toss in a good glug of vegetable oil then pour over a good drizzle of maple syrup. Mix well then roast for 35 minutes until golden.

30p off a bag of Mudwalls Green Kale 250g

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Valid from Friday 6th October – Tuesday 31st October 2017

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